Description of Individual Course Units
Course Unit CodeCourse Unit TitleType of Course UnitYear of StudySemesterNumber of ECTS Credits
190301501101CLASSICAL LITERATURECompulsory115
Level of Course Unit
First Cycle
Objectives of the Course
The course touches upon Plato’s ideas on imitation in relation to art/poetry and Aristothles’s work Poetica and mainly dwelling on the arguments of the latter. After the explanation and discussion of the general characteristics of the classical Greek and Roman literature, works of Homer, Sophocles, Aristophanes (from classical Greek literature) and Seneca, Virgil and Ovid (from Roman literature) are exemplified and examined.
Name of Lecturer(s)
Dr. Öğretim Üyesi Zafer ŞAFAK
Learning Outcomes
1Knowing about what Classical Literature means.
2Knowing about what Classical Literature means.
3Learning about the genres of classical literature.
4Learning about the genres of classical literature.
5To be able to link the relationship between classical Geek and Roman literature.
6To be able to link the relationship between classical Geek and Roman literature.
7To be able to write comparative essay on the works of Classical Greek and Roman Culture.
8To be able to write comparative essay on the works of Classical Greek and Roman Culture.
9To be able to evaluate/criticize the works written about Classical Greek and Roman Culture.
10To be able to evaluate/criticize the works written about Classical Greek and Roman Culture.
Mode of Delivery
Daytime Class
Prerequisites and co-requisities
-
Recommended Optional Programme Components
The participants are expected to have obtained Classical Literature A Concise History by Richard Rutherford/Blackwell Publishing (2005) and scrutinize the book. Please note that the weekly schedule concerning this course can be ever-changing.
Course Contents
The course covers the notions of tragedy, comedy, poetry, epic and satire in the west with its historical development dating back to ancient Greek and Roman culture.
Weekly Detailed Course Contents
WeekTheoreticalPracticeLaboratory
1Introduction: Characteristics of classical Greek literature
2The conception of epic, tragedy, poetry and comedy in relation to classical Greek literature--
3Introduction and the discussion of Aristotle’s Poetica as a founding text and criteria for classical art with specific reference to dramatic forms and their elements in which Aristotle expound upon the unities, hamartia, hubris, nemesis, catharsis, peripetia and anagnorisis--
4Heroic age and heroic ideal in classical Greek literature/epic poetry--
5Homer’s Iliad--
6Sophocles’ Oedipus the King as a Greek drama/tragedy Aristophanes’ Lysistrata as a Greek comedy--
7Mid-Term Exam--
8Characteristics of Roman literature--
9Epic, tragedy, comedy, satire and rhetoric in relation to classical Roman literature--
10Ars Poetica by Horace as a preliminary classical Roman literary criticism--
11Aeneid by Virgil as a Roman epic--
12Excerpts from Horace as genre of satire--
13Presentation and discussions of excerpts from Juvenal for Roman satire
14Ovid’s Ars Amatoria as an example for Roman rhetoric--
Recommended or Required Reading
Blackwell Guides to Classical Literature: A Guide to Ancient Greek Drama by Ian C. Storey, Arlene Allan/ Wiley-Blackwell (2005) A History of Ancient Greek Literature, by Gilbert Murray Cornell, University Library(2009) The Classical Tradition: Greek and Roman Influences on Western Literature by Gilbert Highet (1985) 1st Week: A Student’s Guide to Classics by Jeffrey O. Nelson Jeremy M. Beer(2003) What is Classics? (pp. 1-21) 2nd Week: Epic, Poetry, Drama, Prose Fiction, Literary Criticism (pp. 11-59), 3rd Week: Aristotles’ Poetics 4th Week: Epic Poetry Homer, Apollonius, Virgil with a Chapter on the Gilgamesh Poems by Charles Rowan Beye(2006) Oral Poetry, Poet’s World, Poetic Technique (pp.1-74.) 5th Week: Homer’s Iliad (pp.113-144) 6th Week: The Theatre of Apollo Divine Justice and Sophocles' Oedipus the King by R . Drew Griffit(1996), Asserting Eternal Providence: The Question of Guilt (pp. 45-59), The Authority of Prophecy: Theodicy in the play (pp. 59-70), Reading the Name of Oedipus and Other Riddles (pp. 70-76), The Humiliation of Oedipus (pp. 76-82), Conclusion (pp. 82-87) 7th Week: Talking about Laughter and Other Studies in Greek Comedy, by Alan H. Sommerstein(2009), The anatomy of euphemism in Aristophanic comedy (pp. 70-104), Talking about laughter in Aristophanes( pp. 104-116) -Mid-Term- 9th – 15th Week: The Cambridge History of Classical Literature Latin Literature by E. J. Kenney(1982), (pp. 5-10) 10th Week: (pp. 53-60) 11st Week: (pp.77-138) 12nd Week: (pp. 346-368) 13rd Week: (pp. 370-385) 14th Week: (pp. 597-624)
Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Assessment Methods and Criteria
Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
Midterm Examination1100
SUM100
End Of Term (or Year) Learning ActivitiesQuantityWeight
Final Examination1100
SUM100
Term (or Year) Learning Activities40
End Of Term (or Year) Learning Activities60
SUM100
Language of Instruction
English
Work Placement(s)
-
Workload Calculation
ActivitiesNumberTime (hours)Total Work Load (hours)
Midterm Examination12020
Final Examination12020
Attending Lectures14342
Discussion11515
Criticising Paper15050
TOTAL WORKLOAD (hours)147
Contribution of Learning Outcomes to Programme Outcomes
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* Contribution Level : 1 Very low 2 Low 3 Medium 4 High 5 Very High
 
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